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Mount Street Gardens

Welcome to Mount Street Gardens

This is an attractive London open space in the heart of Mayfair. It is hidden behind houses/large mansion blocks and 2 Churches in the midst of a quiet residential area.

This is an attractive London open space in the heart of Mayfair. It is hidden behind houses/large mansion blocks and 2 Churches in the midst of a quiet residential area. The space consists of many large London Plane trees, with formal lawns, planting beds of ornamental bedding plants and shrubs, and benches aligning the paths. All the benches located in this garden have been donated by or in memory of people who have loved and used the space throughout the years. The site also consists of a drinking fountain, a bird bath and bird identification panel. The gardens have been consistently acknowledged for retaining and providing a high standard of open space by achieving Green Flag awards since 2007. This is a great space to spend a quiet peaceful summers afternoon – escaping the hectic existence of central London.

This open space was originally established in 1723 as a burial ground for the parish church of St. George Hanover Square. From 1725 the Parish workhouse and Parish watchmens quarters and watch-house were located to the north of the site. However, as the population of London increased the workhouse became increasingly overcrowded and was relocated to a larger site in 1871. In 1886 the workhouse buildings were demolished and the area redeveloped with Mount Street being widened and Carlos Place being added, thus providing the current spacious character of the gardens’ context and the surrounding area as one finds it today. The name Mount Street comes from Mount Field, which included Oliver's Mount, the remains of fortifications erected during the English Civil war.

At the east end of the gardens and facing one as one enters the gardens at the north east corner is the Church of the Immaculate Conception. The church was built between 1844 and 1849, and was decorated in neo-gothic style, it was designed by J.J.Scoles, with the alter by Pugin, and is now a Grade II* listed building.

The original parish burial ground was closed in 1854 following an Act of Parliament prohibiting burials in central London on public health grounds. As part of the redevelopment of the area there was a new road planned through the disused burial ground, however, this was never built and the area became a garden. In 1889 the pathways were laid out and the general layout of the gardens remains unchanged today.

The bronze drinking fountain of a rearing horse was designed by Sir Ernest George and Harold Peto, and was restored in 2005 by the residents of St. James and Mayfair.

Disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.