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Abington Street Gardens

Welcome to Abington Street Gardens

A small, formal London Square with a well laid out lawn. The main focus of the space is a Henry Moore sculpture.

Its relatively simple structure creates a refreshing contrast to the high profile location at the back of Westminster Abbey and adjacent to the Houses of Parliament.

A linear raised planter creates a simple edge to the space and divides it from the adjacent road, Abingdon Street. Otherwise, there is no formal enclosure to the space and it is accessible at all times

During the summer the space is sometimes used for events with the addition of a temporary and informal stage.

Disabled access


If you want to hold an event or film in this park, please note that it is not managed by Westminster City Council and you will need to contact the relevant landowner directly for permission.

The general landscape character of the square is quite light, open and airy with a fully mature and well established leaf canopy overhead, creating a pleasant shady space with dappled sunlight during summer. It was originally laid out in the mid 18th century by architect William Kent.

A cross structured central path divides the space into the 4 areas and is lined with traditional park benches. Various sculptures and traditional stone planters are arranged around the square. One of the square’s statues dates from 1858 and is by the Pre-Raphaelite sculptor Alexander Munro.

The surrounding London Plane trees of the square are among the oldest to be found in Mayfair, and were planted in 1789 by a resident of the square at that time, Edward Bouverie.

The square takes its name from the Berkley family whose original London home, Berkeley House stood nearby up until 1733, and whose main ancestral Gloucestershire residence is Berkeley Castle.

Initially in the 1730's Berkeley Square, was only developed on its east and west sides. This was largely due to a sales agreement stipulating that there could be no obstructions to the view from Berkeley House across the gardens of Landsdowne House towards the new central garden Berkley Square. Consequently early plans show that the original oval central garden area was generally quite open in character.

Despite being very central, the square is relatively peaceful and quiet. Throughout the years the square has been the home to various well known residents including Winston Churchill who as child lived at no.48, as well as the P G Wodehouse's fictional character Bertie Wooster.

Disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

A London Square contained on two sides by 1980’s pastiche white stucco façade houses. There is a fountain at one end and a central grass area. A series of well planted borders and a cluster of mature trees create a strong boundary between the space and Vauxhall Bridge Road.

Bessborough Gardens was originally the site of Holy Trinity Church designed by J. Pearson in 1849-52. The church was demolished in 1954 due to bomb damage. Bessborough Gardens is named after Lord Bessborough (John William Ponsonby, The 4th Earl of Bessborough, 1781 –1847), a British politician who was Home Secretary in 1834.

A website specific to the site is currently under construction: www.bessboroughgardens.com/index.html

Disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

It was constructed in 1974 on land that was formally housing in an attempt to provide a densely populated inner city area with much needed public open space. The original houses were knocked down to create the open space. The site has suffered some subsidence problems and was closed in September 2008 whilst the necessary stabilisation works were carried out.

The new park was re-opened at the end of summer 2010.


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

It is a pleasant and calm place to spend a lunch hour or afternoon away from the hectic hustle and bustle of the nearby parallel shopping street. Oxford Street is known as Europe’s most dense and busiest shopping street and Brown Hart Gardens provides the perfect contrast to escape the crowds.

The site sometimes holds public events within the space including open-air theatre and classical concerts, and local children’s fundays. These events are organised and advertised through the area’s major landowner Grosvenor.

The history of the site is very interesting and stems back to the late 1880s when Duke Street, an already thriving trading street, was extended to the west with the development of the Stalbridge, Balderton, and Chesham Buildings. As part of these developments the Duke of Westminster requested that both a coffee tavern and a public garden be included. The former was never realised, but space was cleared between Brown Street and Hart Street to create a communal garden at ground level. The gardens were originally called Duke Street Gardens, they were designed by Joseph Meston, and constructed in 1889 for the residents of the new flats. The gardens at this time had a simple structure and consisted of a shelter at the centre, a urinal at the western end, a drinking fountain to the east and included tree planting.

However, just 14 years later, in 1903, the original gardens were closed when the second Duke of Westminster leased the land to the Westminster Electricity Supply Co. to build a sub-station. Despite various complaints about the former gardens attracting 'disorderly boys', 'verminous women' and 'tramps', the local residents were far from impressed with the idea of loosing the trees and amenity space. In a response to residents complaints the sub-station scheme proposed to reinstate the communal garden above a chamber for transformers and include trees in planters. The new Duke Street Garden was opened on 16 June 1906 by the Mayor of Westminster, Lord Cheylesmore.

The substation building that was created remains the base of the open space today is rather ornate, constructed from Portland Stone, it consists of a domed pavilion with steps leading up to the open space at both ends of the site. The Baroque style of the structure is accentuated by a series of Diocletian windows running along the two sides that allow light into the galleries of the engine rooms below, and the stone balustrade above at the garden level.

As the space falls within The Grosvenor Estate, the park has a unique set of byelaws, some of which are rather interesting and give an indication of how the space might have been when first created. It states for example that ‘no idle or disorderly person is allowed in the garden’; ‘No bath chair or perambulator or vehicle of any kind is admitted’; and that ‘brawling, quarrelling, gambling, playing cards or dice, singing, and practicing gymnastics’ are all prohibited within the gardens.

A website specific to the site can be viewed at: www.brownhartgardens.co.uk


If you want to hold an event or film in this park, please note that it is not managed by Westminster City Council and you will need to contact the relevant landowner directly for permission.

The character varies along the length incorporating some very green and leafy scenery as well as passing through more industrial areas.

Disabled access (although some stepped access from the street along its length) Café and refreshments (independent to the open space) at various points along the route Toilets (independent to the open space) at various points along the route


If you want to hold an event or film in this park, please note that it is not managed by Westminster City Council and you will need to contact the relevant landowner directly for permission.

The top of the space provides great views over the nearby Royal Park - St James Park. The Mall is the Queens ceremonial approach route to Buckingham Palace and is also now the end line of the London Marathon.


If you want to hold an event or film in this park, please note that it is not managed by Westminster City Council and you will need to contact the relevant landowner directly for permission.

The site is divided into two main parts. These include a young children’s play area for ages 3-7year olds and a separate multi-use games area where older children can play ball games... These 2 spaces are separated by an area of green space planted with wisteria and other climbing plants. The site has a permanent site attendant, has disabled access, and does not allow dogs.

Dogs not allowed Disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

Informal clusters of mature trees provide partial shade and shelter in summer with ornamental garden lawns, shrubs and flower beds. It is located in the north west corner of Oxford Circus and is directly across Oxford Street from Hanover Square.  It can be considered one of the West End’s green oases providing an easily accessible contrast to the hectic hustle and bustle of nearby Oxford Street.

Cavendish Square was first developed in 1717 by the 2nd Earl of Oxford for his wife Henrietta Cavendish-Hollace. Cavendish Square became popularised by references to it in books by Charles Dickens, including Nicholas Nickleby, Little Dorrit and Barnaby Rudge. The square once contained the statue of William Duke of Cumberland who defeated the Bonnie Prince Charles at the battle of Culloden. This statue was removed in the late 19th century. The other statue in the square is that of Lord George Bentinck a late 19th century Conservative MP.

The grandeose facades of some of the houses on the north side of the Square are remnants of a mansion begun in 1720 for the Duke of Chandos. Past residents of the square include Nelson who lived there in 1787.

The garden was originally a simple circle of grass with sheep grazing upon it. This was then developed into a designed garden by the English garden designer Charles Bridgeman.

In 1971 a large underground car park was built beneath the Square. At this same time the gardens were re-designed by Urban Designer and Landscape Architect Michael Brown, and many references to his approach and design style remain in the gardens today, for example the engineering brick paving.

The garden now includes a low circular grass mound which creates a key feature in its own right and during the summer months is popular with sunbathers.

Opening hours: 8:00 – dusk. Disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

It is enclosed on all four sides with the Channel 4 offices along the north and west sides, and residential blocks along the south and east sides of the space. The overall development was carried out by the Richard Rogers partnership and completed in 1994, with the park as a key central feature of the design, allowing the surrounding buildings a pleasant peaceful, green space to look into.

The site is interspersed with trees and bordered by hedging. A path meanders through the site. The main lawn area is slightly raised with timber sleeper steps to access the raised space, with play equipment incorporated into the space. Due to the space being contained on all sides by buildings it is a relatively calm and quiet space as passers-by often do not even realise it is there. It has an overall contemporary landscape feel and character.

Opening hours: 7am – dusk. Disabled access


If you want to hold an event or film in this park, please note that it is not managed by Westminster City Council and you will need to contact the relevant landowner directly for permission.

Two statues are in the park of Purcell and Suffragettes. Used mainly as a pedestrian thoroughfare to link through from Victoria street to St James Park and underground station or by office workers as a place to eat lunch.

Disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

This site consists of 2 large plant beds in the approach to Vauxhall Bridge, and the lower area alongside the River Thames. Generally hard surface finish with some tree planting associated to the adjacent residential riverside developments. There are some benches with river views.

Gates restrict access to some sections of the site at night.

Disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

It is divided into various zones containing a range of facilities and enclosed by adjacent buildings. A small quiet seating area is at the front of the space, with a raised play area in the middle and a multi-sport court at the back. An attractive arbour with climbing plants divides the quiet seating area from the more active and lively play areas.

The multi-use sports court is open to all users of the garden for ball games. The site also includes a Children's and a Disabled toilet, available on request.

Opening hours: 8am – dusk.

Toilets with limited public access Play area and ballcourt. Disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

The mature London Planes provide a shaded spot away from the constant movement of the surrounding area where residents, tourists arriving in London, and office workers can relax.

 This small London Square consists of formal lawns, bedding plants and ornamental shrubs and is bordered by London Plane trees. The space is contained and enclosed by the various adjacent residential blocks. A fountain sits at the centre of the square.

The square opened to the public in 1884 but was originally laid out around 1820.

The name ‘Ebury’ is thought to stem from an area in the vicinity that was known as "Eia" and is mentioned in the Domesday Book. This name then evolved into ‘Eabery’, and as such Eabery Farm stood on this site prior to the gardens. In 1676 Eabery Farm became the property of the Grosvenor family. It consisted of 430 acres in Queen Elizabeth I's time, and is mentioned as early as 1307, when Edward I gave John de Benstede permission to fortify it.

Disabled access Dogs not allowed


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

Most of the site is laid to grass with mature trees and paths running diagonally across the site from each corner entrance. The paths converge and meet in the middle with a circular paving and rock feature. The site includes an old stone water trough and a small play area, mainly for younger children, is located on the Oakington Road side.

Disabled access Play area


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

This is a predominantly paved area with yorkstone paving and planting.

Opening hours: 7am – dusk. Disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

There is a raised central paved area, at the centre of which is a statue of George II on a plinth. During the summer months the square and the benches placed around the square are filled with people sitting having their lunches or just passing the time of day.

?The garden was originally known as Goldring Square, and is thought to have been laid out according to plans by Sir Christopher Wren, around the year 1670s. The central statue is one of only two public statues of George II in the capital. The original gardens were geometrically structured with four square grass areas around a smaller central area. The areas were divided by gravelled paths with trees at even spacing and enclosed with wooden pale fencing. By 1754 the formal layout had been replaced and the leafy trees removed in line with the fashion of the time. A large circular lawn had been created with a gravel path surrounding it and iron railing with lamp standards at each corner. It was at this time (14th March 1753) that the stone statue of the then reigning sovereign George II was erected and is thought to be by John Van Nost.

Sadly, by 1783 the gardens were again starting to deteriorate, and in the 1820’s a second Act was passed relating to the gardens and they were re-structured into having a central square feature with gravel paths, trees and shrubs and a decade later Dickens described it as 'a little wilderness of shrubs' watched over by a 'mournful statue'.

During the second world war (1939–45) an air-raid shelter was dug beneath the garden and the enclosing iron railings were removed for salvage. This lead to the site deteriorating and becoming derelict until it was taken over by the Westminster City Council on lease from the trustees of the square. The gardens were restored and re-opened to the public in November 1952.

Disabled access Dogs not allowed


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

Further information about Green Park can be found on the Royal Parks website:

www.royalparks.org.uk/parks/green_park/


If you want to hold an event or film in this park, please contact the Royal Parks directly for permission.

The site includes the memorial to Britons who died at the World Trade Centre and the Pentagon attacks of 9/11. This memorial consists of a garden and a pavilion and pergola made from Oak inscribed with the words "Grief is the price we pay for love", taken from a message in response to the attacks from the Queen. The planting consists of North American and British species that specifically flower and are at their prime throughout September coinciding with the anniversary.

The square takes its name from the Grosvenor family as it was Sir Richard Grosvenor who in 1710 acquired a licence for its development. The square was then not actually developed until around 1721but then consistently remained a highly desirable place to live up until the mid twentieth century.

Despite the majority of the early surrounding buildings being very well designed and noticeably grand, many of these were rebuilt in the late 18th and 19th century including number 26, which was rebuilt in 1773 by the famous Neo-classical Scottish architect Robert Adam. Despite having apparently been a fine example of his work in terms of employing classical grandeur appropriately within a confined space, this too was later demolished in the late 19th century. Much of the architecture that now surrounds the square with the exception of the American Embassy building is neo-Georgian.

The central square was originally purely for the residents of the square and only became a public open space in 1948. Its creation was lead by its founder Richard Grosvenor. It is thought that the original layout was designed by gardener John Alston and consisted of an oval shaped space contained by a low brick wall with a fence on top and central iron gates along each side of the square. The design was generally formal in layout with paths of both grass and gravel dividing the area into geometric sub areas which were planted tightly yet informally with flowering shrubs and evergreens, and with elm hedging surrounding the plots. At the centre of the square a large central raised grassed platform housed a statue of King George I, made of lead and gilded, on a stone plinth by John Nost. Despite the overall structure remaining the same a map of 1792 shows that at this time the shrubs had been replaced by more naturalistic clumps of planting.

By 1926 Grosvenor Square gardens had taken on the character of a typical London square, with informally grouped mature trees, and a tennis court had been added, replacing one of the four symmetrical areas around the central sqaure, which remained minus the statue. In 1938 the American Embassy came to the square, and in 1960 the current American Embassy building was built dominating west side of the square. This highly modern building, designed by Eero Saarinen, was understandably initially highly controversial significantly standing out from its predominantly Georgian and neo-Georgian surroundings and context, despite this in 2009 English Heritage granted it a Grade II listing.

In 1948 when the square became a public place, it was redesigned by the architect B. W. L. Gallannaugh. It was dramatically altered in terms of both structure and planting with a new north-south axis and the replacement of the original evergreen trees with new London Plane trees and cherry trees noticably transforming the landscape character. Due to the proximity of the American Embassy the site was chosen to host the British memorial to President Roosevelt, a bronze statue of whom was created by the sculptor Sir William Reid Dick and unveiled by Mrs. Roosevelt the same year. There is also a statue of Eisenhower, by Robert Lee Dean.

Disabled access


If you want to hold an event or film in this park, please note that it is not managed by Westminster City Council and you will need to contact the relevant landowner directly for permission.

The first square to be laid out for building was Hanover Square which was started in about 1717 and named after the new king, George I, who was the Elector of Hanover in Germany. These original gardens at the centre of Hanover Square were quite plain and minimal, but by the time of the 1750's a bird's eye view drawing shows diagonal paths had been added forming the shape of a cross. These paths were replaced before 1787 with a circular path running round the circumference bordered by trees.

Shortly after the Second World War this was succeeded by diagonal paths again and a pond with a fountain near the north end. The bronze statue of the Prime Minister William Pitt the Younger (1759-1806) was created by the great sculptor Sir Francis Legatt Chantrey and has stood at the southern end of the square since 1831, and famously survived an attempt by Reform Bill agitators to pull it down at its unveiling.

In order to prevent the gardens falling into decline and becoming derelict, the gardens and original gardens committee were supported for many years by Westminster City Council who finally purchased the space in 1997.

Disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

The space is divided into two strips of land, the main strip mainly consists of one large well maintained plant bed that sits along the roadside, with paving and benches overlooking the canal at the canalside of the space.

Open 24 hours.

Disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

Further information about Hyde Park can be found on the Royal Parks website: www.royalparks.org.uk/parks/hyde_park/


If you want to hold an event or film in this park, please contact the Royal Parks directly for permission.

Hyde Park corner sits at the junction of Park Lane, Knightsbridge, Piccadilly, Grosvenor Place and Constitution Hill, and is a connecting transitional open space between Hyde Park and Green Park. Due to the very scale of these surrounding roads the site is essentially in many ways a grand formal accessible round-about. The site consists predominantly of open grass and monuments.

The main feature of the space is the Constitution Arch (more commonly known as the Wellington Arch, it was designed by Decimus Burton as a memorial to the Duke of Wellington and was originally built as a northern grand entrance gate to the grounds of Buckingham Palace.

The site includes various other monuments including a statue of Byron, and both the New Zealand and Australian War Memorials.

In 1952 the sites name "Hyde Park Corner" was used as a code/password to inform the Government about the death of King George VI.

Open 24 hours.


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

The site is directly enclosed by the surrounding buildings, most significantly with St Paul's Church (the Actors’ church) on the East side. The space is generally paved with 2 small raised grass areas either side of the central path leading up to and on the axis of the church. This small churchyard garden consists of lines of benches creating the perfect spot to sit and read ones book on a summer afternoon.

Disabled access Toilets accessed from Covent Garden piazza


If you want to hold an event or film in this park, please note that it is not managed by Westminster City Council and you will need to contact the relevant landowner directly for permission.

The site is currently under construction so temporarily not accessible or open to the public.


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

Further information about Kensington Gardens can be found on the Royal Parks website: www.royalparks.org.uk/parks/kensington_gardens//


If you want to hold an event or film in this park, please contact the Royal Parks directly for permission.

A single brick path meanders through the site from one entrance to a circular seating feature at the other end and a small informal grass area at the heart of the space. Benches align the path with informal shrub and herbaceous planting creating a softer edge around the site boundary. The space is generally contained by low bow-top railings with the addition of a low wall, around the circular seating area as this is the potentially the most vulnerable to vehicles from the adjacent road.

Opening hours: 8am – dusk.

Disabled access

Dogs not allowed


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

Lancaster Gate is in the Bayswater immediately to the north of Kensington Gardens. It is a square dating back to the mid-19th century. The name directly comes from, and references Lancaster Gate, an adjacent entrance to Kensington Gardens.

The space is completely open to the surrounding road. It is a hard landscaped oval area with a monument facing towards the Kensington Gardens and a contemporary bespoke designed semi-circle bench feature at the heart of the space.

The church at the north of the square created a prominent end feature to the space, it was originally called Christ Church, designed by F. & H. Francis Architects as an asymmetrical gothic composition with a needle spire. The church was closed in 1977, and turned into housing in 1983, today all that remains architecturally of the original church are the tower and spire. These do however, retain a striking architectural focal point and climax to the square.


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

This site is currently closed for re-furbishment.

The whole overall area of Leicester Square was pedestrianised in the 1980s, making the entire space feel like a public space, however, the specific leciester square gardens are situated at the heart and centre of the Square.

The gardens have a central marble fountain which contains a 19th century statue of Shakespeare, grass areas and a group of mature London plane trees creating a significant tree canopy overhead. There are four gates at each of the corners of the square each with a bust of a notable historical figure - Sir Isaac Newton, the scientist; Sir Joshua Reynolds, the first President of the Royal Academy; John Hunter, an early surgeon and the artist William Hogarth. The square also contains a statue of Charlie Chaplin.

The Square takes its name from Robert Sidney the 2nd Earl of Leicester, who in 1630 bought 4acres of land in St. Martin's Field, and by 1635, had constructed a large residence called Leicester House. He then set about enclosing the rest of the land surrounding his new home, thus preventing the other inhabitants of the St. Martin's Parish any access to the land. Interestingly, as this land had previously been common land, the local people appealed to King Charles I, who in turn appointed three members of the Privy Council to arbitrate, resulting in Lord Leicester being ordered to keep a section of his land open for the parishioners of St Martins.

This designated land was called Leicester Field, later becoming known as Leicester Square. Leciester House was demolished in the 1790’s. After various disagreements as to whether or not the land could or could not be built upon, in 1874 Albert Grant (1830–1899) bought the freehold of the land, payed for a garden to be created and donated it to the Metropolitan Board of Works (at that time the equivalent of the council) as a gift to the city. Ownership of the square was subsequently passed on to all the various succeeding public bodies and consequently the site is now owned and managed by the City of Westminster.

The square is currently being redesigned with plans to transform Leicester Square into an appropriately contemporary urban public space that can comfortably accommodate all its wide range of various events and visitors.

Disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

This community garden has 2 entrances, with a playarea at one end. At the other end of the space a paved circular contemporary amphitheatre space creates an interesting landscape feature.

This space is managed by local community group mainly consisting of local residents, with the help of Westminster City Council and is opposite to Broadly Street Gardens.

Play equipment

Disabled access

Dogs not allowed


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

The space is surrounded by busy roads and opposite Victoria Station making it a popular place in the summer months with people filling in time before catching a train. Despite the space actually being triangular in form it manages to achieve a formal and balanced structure in its layout. Mature trees align the space and a central path runs through the heart of the space and small hand-detailed pebble patterned huts marking the 2 side entrances. The entrance facing Victoria station is marked by a statue of Ferdinand Foch.

Disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

It consists of two islands surrounded by a busy gyratory traffic system. The eastern island includes a large plaza piazza space with the iconic historic Grade I listed Marble Arch, the National monument that gives the site its name at one end, and a series of relevant flags along each side of the space. A small flight of steps and line of Portland stone planters mark the western edge of the piazza and lead down from the plaza space to a slightly lower grassed terrace. The second more westerly island consists of an even lower grass terrace, water feature and sunken area containing public toilets. The 3 main areas/terraces are linked by a new yorkstone path running along the north end of the site creating a constant level route across the entire space. There is a road limited to busses that cuts through the space and divides the 2 islands.

The piazza space and historic arch are both very well balanced with a 1960’s modernist style scheme incorporating a canopy structure above the stairwell access to the underpass that leads to Marble Arch underground station. The canopy links into a wall that screens the traffic to the west at the top of Park Lane and leads into to a raised seating area looking across the piazza space. This wall detail is repeated and echoed elsewhere across the whole site with various raised planters and subtle changes in level. The material chosen for the 1960s scheme was Portland Stone, which references the light appearance of the arch.

Marble Arch was designed by John Nash and was based upon the triumphal Arch of Constantine in Rome. Originally erected and located on The Mall, it was apparently too small for the Royal coaches to comfortably pass through and so was moved to this location in 1851. The 3 terraces described above and the original fountains were installed in the early Sixties when Park Lane was created. Up until June 2009 the fountains had been out of service for over a decade with the pool sat empty, as part of a public realm improvement project the fountains and pump rooms were recently completely refurbished and reinstated.

Adjacent to the piazza space a similar-sized area of lawn at a slightly lower level provides a soft area for people to sit throughout the summer months. A green oasis in the midst of busy roads. The lawn area is protected from the road to the south due to a large planting bund running along the edge of the space. The bunds are planted with seasonal bedding displays on the sides facing the road so as to provide visual interest at street level. In contrast to the bedding displays the sides of the bunds that face into the space appear as simple grass mounds, creating the impression that the lawn simply sweeps up and flows into the bunds. The eastern lawn is also a site that hosts a changing programme of sculpture for which it is currently hosting a 27ft bronze statue of a horses head by artist N.Fiddian-Green. The recent refurbishment of the site also included new lighting of the arch.

Beyond the Tyburn Way road that divides the 2 islands, the level of the western lawn is slightly lower again, and is also contained and protected by a planting bund along the south side of the space. The bund tapers out as it leads up to the spectacular recently refurbished fountain feature so as to allow views of the fountain from both the lawn and the adjacent road. A series of south facing steps creates a well used sitting area and access from the path to the western lawn. The original axis of the 1960’s scheme ends with the path becoming a bridge over the pool and adjacent to the fountains. Behind the pool there is a lower sunken area with access to the sites public toilets. The new main yorkstone path actually runs along the north side of the island around the back of the western lawn and the top of the pool of water, and creates links and connections to the Edgware Road and Bayswater Road.

Historically the site was known as the site of the "Tyburn Tree". The Tyburn tree was a notorious gallows that was erected in 1571, and where executions took place up until the 18th century. There is a memorial plaque set into the ground at the road crossing towards the Edgware Road for those who died at the gallows, many of whom were catholic martyrs, and there are also long-term plans for a larger more appropriate memorial within the marble arch site.

Disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

The square consists of three small lawns and an area of paving surrounding each lawn. The paths are aligned with seats making a great quiet space for one to spend an afternoon reading a book. Good planting, with a wide diversity of species including holly, bamboo, beech and rowan.

Disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

This is an attractive London open space in the heart of Mayfair. It is hidden behind houses/large mansion blocks and 2 Churches in the midst of a quiet residential area. The space consists of many large London Plane trees, with formal lawns, planting beds of ornamental bedding plants and shrubs, and benches aligning the paths. All the benches located in this garden have been donated by or in memory of people who have loved and used the space throughout the years. The site also consists of a drinking fountain, a bird bath and bird identification panel. The gardens have been consistently acknowledged for retaining and providing a high standard of open space by achieving Green Flag awards since 2007. This is a great space to spend a quiet peaceful summers afternoon – escaping the hectic existence of central London.

This open space was originally established in 1723 as a burial ground for the parish church of St. George Hanover Square. From 1725 the Parish workhouse and Parish watchmens quarters and watch-house were located to the north of the site. However, as the population of London increased the workhouse became increasingly overcrowded and was relocated to a larger site in 1871. In 1886 the workhouse buildings were demolished and the area redeveloped with Mount Street being widened and Carlos Place being added, thus providing the current spacious character of the gardens’ context and the surrounding area as one finds it today. The name Mount Street comes from Mount Field, which included Oliver's Mount, the remains of fortifications erected during the English Civil war.

At the east end of the gardens and facing one as one enters the gardens at the north east corner is the Church of the Immaculate Conception. The church was built between 1844 and 1849, and was decorated in neo-gothic style, it was designed by J.J.Scoles, with the alter by Pugin, and is now a Grade II* listed building.

The original parish burial ground was closed in 1854 following an Act of Parliament prohibiting burials in central London on public health grounds. As part of the redevelopment of the area there was a new road planned through the disused burial ground, however, this was never built and the area became a garden. In 1889 the pathways were laid out and the general layout of the gardens remains unchanged today.

The bronze drinking fountain of a rearing horse was designed by Sir Ernest George and Harold Peto, and was restored in 2005 by the residents of St. James and Mayfair.

Disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

Playground and kick-about area Dogs not allowed Disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

Norfolk Square Gardens provide a quiet space where residents, office workers and visitors alike can sit quietly and relax in the very busy location just yards from Paddington Mainline Station. The garden is laid out with formal lawns, seasonal bedding and ornamental shrubs. The site is occasionally used by local groups for concerts and other events, particularly throughout the summer months.

The garden square was aquired by the City Council through compulsory purchase in the late 1980s and opened to the public in autumn of 1990. The home of the great architect Sir Giles Gilbert Scott is located nearby and the square itself takes a key element of its character from its context surrounded by a number of fine mid 19th-century stuccoed terraced buildings.

Disabled access Dogs not allowed Formal London sq


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

There is a narrow entrance from the street. A “dry stream” feature of blue mosaic tiles winds through the site.
Play equipment
Disabled access
Dogs not allowed


If you want to hold an event or film in this park, please note that it is not managed by Westminster City Council and you will need to contact the relevant landowner directly for permission.

During the week it is a pleasant place to stop and rest in the shopping street but on Saturdays it becomes transformed into a popular, bustling Farmer’s Market. The Pimlico Road Farmer’s Market has about 25 stalls of tempting produce, largely from Kent, Surrey and Sussex.
Disabled access
Disabled toilet
Weekend Farmer’s Market


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

The space consists of grass, shrubs and bedding displays together with mature plane trees that dominate the space and landscape character.

A statue of Lady Sarah Siddons (1755-1831), a famous British actress who lived in the area and whose memorial can be found in the nearby St Mary’s Churchyard, sits within the space facing the Harrow Road.

Opening hours: 8am – dusk. Disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

Set behind the mansion blocks of Maida Vale the site is one of Westminster’s largest spaces. It contains a central “village green” and cricket pitch, a rose garden area and a bandstand. There is a large playground divided into older and younger children’s equipment, a park café, and an environmental area complete with pond and pond dipping platform. The sports facilities are run through a leisure contractor and include tennis courts, cricket practice nets, pavilion and gym, running track, football and hockey pitches, and a bowling green and clubhouse.

Disabled access Toilets, including disabled Gym and leisure centre, fitness trail, cricket pitch and practice nets, athletics track, hockey and 5-a-side football pitches, tennis courts Café and refreshments Car park Wildlife area


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

It is separated from the main part of Paddington Street Gardens by Paddington Street. It is a square space, with a central grass area and various memorials, tombs, and gravestones. It is raised from the road and accessed via steps from the street.

Opening hours 7am – dusk.


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

It is significantly larger than the nearby North side of Paddington Street Gardens. It consists of formal open grass areas, traditional shrub, rose and bedding displays, mature London plane trees, a shelter and a children’s playground. Public toilets also serve the site from Paddington Street. In the summer months events including open air concerts are sometimes held within this site.

Paddington Street Gardens were formed during the 18th century as an additional burial ground for the old St Marylebone Parish Church. The land on the south side of Paddington Street (established in the 1760s), was donated to the parish by Edward Harley, Earl of Oxford, in 1730 and consecrated as a burial ground in 1733. By 1771 additional space for graves was required and the parish bought the piece of land on the north side of the street from Mr. Henry Portman.

One of the conditions of the grant of 1730 was that a workhouse for the poor of the parish should be built and this was done in 1750-52. A larger workhouse was built in 1775 just to the north of these gardens on the present site of the University of Westminster and the old workhouse which was in the southern burial ground was then used as the parish infirmary until 1791. The infirmary was replaced in 1792 by a larger building which stood beside the new workhouse.

When the St John's Wood burial ground opened in 1814, this one was officially closed although it was sometimes used for burials after this date and there are probably around 80,000 graves here. The gardens are still consecrated ground. An index of the names on tombstones in this burial ground transcribed at various dates from the 1833 to 1979 can be found in the Westminster City archives.

In 1885 the gardens became a recreational ground which was officially opened by HRH Princess Louise on 6 July 1886. Most of the tombstones have been removed but the mausoleum in the south garden that was erected by the Hon Richard Fitzpatrick to the memory of his wife Susanna who died in 1759 aged 30 remains due to its notable design.

There is a statue of an Orderly boy by Donato Baraglia of Milan (1849-1930) which was placed in the gardens in 1943. The principal species of tree within the gardens is the London Plane, this species was planted widely in Victorian London as it thrived in a polluted atmosphere. There are also many other species of trees to be found within the gardens including cherries, laburnum and hawthorns.

Opening hours: 7am – dusk. Play area Disabled access Toilets, including disabled, accessible from Paddington Street


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

The central space is not easily accessible as it is surrounded by busy roads. However, once at the central space a wealth of famous and historical statues await, together with uninterrupted views of the Houses of Parliament and Big Ben.

Apart from the Palace of Westminster famously located at the East side of the square, there are numerous other monumental buildings of national importance around the square including Westminster Abbey.

Statues that can be found within the space include statues of Winston Churchill (at the North-East side of the green overlooking Parliament), Abraham Lincoln (in front of Middlesex Guildhall - the seat of the supreme court), Robert Peel (at the South-West of the green), Lord Palmerston (at the North-West edge of the sqaure), Jan Christian Smuts, Edward Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby, Disraeli and George Canning and various other well-known statesmen.

One of the most recent additions is a nine-foot high bronze statue of Nelson Mandela added to the square on 29 August 2007.

Parliament Square dates back to 1868 and was created to open up the area around the Palace of Westminster. The development was designed by architect Sir Charles Barry and involved a significant amount of property clearance. One of the aims was also to improve the general traffic flow of the area and the development is said to have included London's first traffic signals. The square was re-designed in 1950 by George Grey Wornum, and at the same time control of the space was transferred from the Parliamentary Estate to the Greater London Authority.

The Eastern side of Parliament square, opposite one of the main entrances to the Houses of Parliament, has throughout history become a place where people can protest against government policies, actions or lack of action, often adding another dimension to the square.

Disabled access

Dogs not allowed


If you want to hold an event or film in this park, please note that it is not managed by Westminster City Council and you will need to contact the relevant landowner directly for permission.

It consists of a very simple layout with grass, mature London Plane trees and statues. One of the most notable statues in the gardens commemorates "William Huskisson – Statesman, financier and member of parliament by the artist HYPERLINK "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Gibson_(sculptor)" o "John Gibson (sculptor)" John Gibson.

The London Boating Base is immediately adjacent to the space.

Opening hours: 8am – dusk. Disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

This square is a pleasant peaceful place to spend a summer’s afternoon calmly reading a book or paper. ?Porchester Square was completed between 1855 and 1858, and was one of the last areas of Bayswater to be developed and built. Eight different builders were involved with different parts of the square as can be seen from a variety of exterior details on the houses. The architect most closely concerned with Porchester Square was George Wyatt, but the final word on both the general layout and the architectural detail would have been with George Gutch who in 1822 became the surveyor of the Bishop of London's Paddington estate and so supervised the overall development of the whole of Bayswater.

The name Porchester comes from one of the Hampshire estates of the Thistlewaites who with only two or three other families had been chief lessees of the Bishop of London's land in Paddington since before 1750. In 1955 when the Church Commission offered the leases of Porchester Square for sale, the northern side and some of the surrounding area was bought by the London County Council with a view to the complete rehabilitation of these fine Victorian houses. The gardens themselves were also acquired by Paddington Borough Council at this time and were first opened to the public in 1955.

The main tree species that can be found in the garden is the London Plane (Platanus x hispanica), these large mature plane trees help define and provide Porchester Square with the landscape character of a typical London Square. Other trees that can be found in the space are the Double Gean (Prunus avium 'Plena') and Indian Horse Chestnut (Aesculus indica).

Opening hours: 8am - dusk Play area Disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

The square has a formal layout with grass areas, shrub beds and mature London Plane trees.


If you want to hold an event or film in this park, please note that it is not managed by Westminster City Council and you will need to contact the relevant landowner directly for permission.

It contains a wealth of facilities including a playground, multi-use (and free to use) ballcourt, rose gardens, wildlife garden, a specifically designated “dog run” area, and seating. Open grass mounds provide interest at one end of the site and help screen the site from the adjacent road and surrounding houses.

The site contains a wildlife area that is run and managed by Westminster, providing a haven for birds, butterflies, bats, beetles and lots more. Created during 2007 and designed in conjunction with the local community the wildlife area contains among other benefits an outdoor classroom, various wildlife habitats and composting facilities. Hedgerows, trees and shrubs, tall grasses, wildflowers, woodpiles, a composting area, climbers and creepers all provide birds, small mammals and insects with food shelter and places to breed. The site is particularly important for the survival of the House Sparrow, as the dense hedging on the perimeter and within the park creates a perfect nesting habitat. Once a common and numerous bird in London, the House Sparrow is now in dramatic decline (decline of 85 % from 1975 to 1995) and Queen's Park Gardens supports one of only four known colonies in Westminster.

An informal woodland walk leads to a viewing platform that overlooks the wildlife area, whilst access into the wildlife area itself is restricted, retaining it as a haven for the species it supports.

The garden has a rose garden that provides pleasant and calm contrast to many of the various other more active facilities provided within the park. The garden has links to the local community through the Queens Park Neighborhood Forum who are actively involved in the improvement of the gardens, an interested group of local residents forming a Friends of the gardens group.

The gardens are set within the Queens Park Estate, built from 1874 by the Artizans and Labourers' General Dwellings Company. The estate consists of approximately 2,000 distinctive small brick houses with Gothic-revival refernces within the architecture. It retains Avenues 1-6 and originally had streetnames with letters A-P. However, these have now been replaced with full word titles beginning with each letter, eg Alperton St, Barfett St, Caird Street etc.

Ballcourt

Play areas formal and informal

Wildlife area

Disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

A large grass area and trees form the main part of the space with two 5-a-side football goals creating an informal grass practice pitch at another end of the park.

Disabled access Dogs not allowed Informal 5 a-side football practice area


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

Further information about the park can be found on the Royal Parks website here.


If you want to hold an event or film in this park, please contact the Royal Parks directly for permission.

Situated at the Junction of Warwick Avenue and Harrow Road adjacent to "Brownings Pool" and the Paddington Arm of the Grand Union Canal, they contain seating that overlooks the picturesque canal side scene.

The gardens are relatively formal in feel and contain lawns along with good bedding plant displays, shrub borders and access to the canal towpath, they also contain public toilets (including Disabled WC).

The Gardens were first laid out in the early 1950's and the original name was Warwick Avenue Gardens. In 1975 the name was changed when the City of Westminster was linked with the City of Amsterdam in Holland. The Dutch presented tulips to the City Council and an opening ceremony was held with the Dutch in full national dress.

Works to bring the garden up to modern standards and make it compliant with the Disability Discrimination act were carried out during 2006. At this time the main garden underwent a major upgrade of its infrastructure and horticultural features.

This is a beautiful spot to spend a summer’s afternoon reading a book and enjoying the view over the adjacent canal.

Disabled access Toilets Dogs not allowed


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

The space is triangular in form and contemporary in feel – it creates a calmer area adjacent to the busy Millbank Road and a more pleasant green route for those walking to Tate Britain or the river-bus pier. It is completely open at all times and from all sides, and is particularly well used by nearby office workers to eat their lunches or take a breath of fresh air.

The site includes a statue by Henry Moore entitled "Locking Piece" this is on loan from the near by Tate Britain and the Henry Moore foundation. It was created in 1963/64 and was discussed and described by Henry Moore himself in an extract from the Henry Moore Foundation Archive: " I was playing with two pebbles which I found like that and somehow or other they got locked together and I couldn't get them undone and I wondered how they got into position and it was like a clenched fist being tightly … Anyhow, eventually I did get it to [separate]; by turning and lifting, one piece came off the other. This gave one the idea of making two forms which would do that and later I called it 'Locking Piece' because they lock together.”

The current layout of Riverside Walk Gardens was designed and created in 2004 and was funded by London Development Agency, Cross River Partnership, Government Office for London and the Henry Moore Foundation along with the City of Westminster.

Historically before being a public garden the site was previously a dock and was notoriously the location from where criminals being transported to Australia boarded ships and embarked on their long journeys to the other side of the world. There is a commemorative pillar on site with an inscription remembering those who were sent to Australia many as a price to pay for relatively small and insignificant crimes. The inscription reads: "Near this site stood Millbank Prison, which was opened in 1816 and closed in 1890. This buttress stood at the head of the river steps from which, until 1867, prisoners sentenced to transportation embarked on their journey to Australia"

Disabled access to park but not along river walk (steps to Vauxhall Bridge)


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

The space comprises of an amphitheatre designed with grass terraces and tree planting. There are various pieces of public art throughout the space itself and along the nearby adjacent canal towpath.

Opening hours: 24 hours. Café and refreshments Disabled access


If you want to hold an event or film in this park, please note that it is not managed by Westminster City Council and you will need to contact the relevant landowner directly for permission.

A path runs through the space, sloping down from both entrances to a central tarmac area with a block paving feature in the middle.

No disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

It has a traditional layout with a central mock-Tudor building. The half-timbered black and white building in the centre which was built in 1895, refurbished in 2009 and is now used by the gardeners. The square is largely paved, interspersed with four symmetrical lawn areas, with mature trees and shrub planting.

Soho Square dates back to around 1681 in an area of land known previously as Soho fields. It is recorded that in the 1790s the garden was planted with almond, peach, cherry, lilac, rose, laburnum and honeysuckle.

Originally it contained a statue of Charles II in the centre of the garden above a fountain with a basin and figures representing the rivers Thames, Severn, Tyne and Humber. The square was also the site of air-raid shelters during the second World War that were built beneath the grass areas of the square and were essential for nearby local residents during the London Blitz. Today the gardens provide a green oasis in the densly built-up West End.

Dogs not allowed No disabled access Formal London Square


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

Access to the space is from Wardour Street via a set of steps. A central path with grass either side and shrub beds at the edges leads to a raised terrace in front of the tower. The site contains various memorials including William Hazlett and the victims of the Admiral Duncan bombing, and grave stones and plaques. The site has a feature fence along Wardour Street called the ‘Wall of light’ which was commended by The Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors in 2004 in the Community benefit category of the RICS Awards 2004. The site also contains a small “toilet pod” which doubles as a mini local museum with limited public access. At the back of the churchyard a large bespoke community table was recently added to the space, and is very well used.

This space is a great hidden pocket of green space in the heart of soho and is a great space to escape the general hustle and bustle of the nearby streets to read a book or the paper. It is the only green space serving the dense urban area of lower Soho and is used extensively by The Soho School who have raised beds within the garden where the local school children learn about and practice growing vegetables. Apart from the school children who regularly use the churchyard the other main group is Soho Green which is made up of residents living in the area.

The original church and churchyard date from 1686 and it is estimated that there were over 100,000 burials within the ¾ acre churchyard up until the year 1853 when all burials in churchyards were stopped by an act of parliament. In 1891 the Metropolitan Public Gardens Association laid out the Churchyard as a public garden which was officially opened by lady Hobhouse on the 27 June 1892. Responsibility for the garden was then passed to the City of Westminster in 1903. The most eminent person buried in the churchyard was William Hazlitt, essayist, who died in 1830.

The design and creation of the ‘wall of light’ stemmed from the fact that a decade ago due to its location within soho the churchyard had became a meeting place for drug addicts and dealers who were gaining access at night, this meant that in the mornings the gardens were littered with used needles and other rubbish. As a response to this a group of local residents decided to take action to regenerate the churchyard so that it could fulfil its potential as a welcoming urban open space. The group managed to organise the building of the new security fence with oak posts and a stainless steel mesh. The fence also incorporated fibre optic lights installed to shine onto the mesh. Six colours can be projected onto the screen in blocks of colour or programmed as a dynamic light display. This was the first time fibre optic lighting had been used together with stainless steel mesh in that way in the UK. It was for this reason and the fact that the design solution so cleverly secured the space whilst adding a distinctive night time lighting design feature that lead to it being commended and achieving the award.

Opening hours 10 am – dusk. No disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

The square consists of a large area of lawn in the centre, paths and shrubs around the edge and a separate dog area at one end.

Pimlico's development was started in 1835 by the Marquess of Westminster who owned the land. The construction of both the buildings around St George’s Square and the square itself was largely supervised by Thomas Cubitt. St George's Square was originally laid out in 1839, at this time it simply consisted of two parallel streets running north to south and by 1843 it had been transformed into a formal square, and became a fully residential lived in square in 1854. It was a highly desirable place to live as it was London's only residential square open on one side to the River Thames, and up until 1874 the square for fortunate enough to have its own pier for boats and steamers.

The church of St Saviour was built at the north end of the square in 1864 and to this day shelters the square from the more busy Lupus Street.

This square is generous in size and a very pleasant peaceful space to spend a summer’s afternoon.

Has a dog area Disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

Further information about the park can be found on the Royal Parks website here.


If you want to hold an event or film in this park, please contact the Royal Parks directly for permission.

A tarmac path with rolled gravel skirts the square with a shrub bed and railings adjacent to the road. The four paths join a central circular path around a central circular grass area with a statue man on horseback on a plinth in the centre of the square entitled "Gulielmus III".

The square is predominantly surrounded by Georgian and neo-Georgian architecture and remains a privately owned and managed garden.

Opening hours: 10am-4.30pm.

Disabled access


If you want to hold an event or film in this park, please note that it is not managed by Westminster City Council and you will need to contact the relevant landowner directly for permission.

It is formed around a central fountain feature, and contains numerous large London Plane trees that dominate the space.

Disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

Large trees give the park maturity and a sense of a well established landscape. Facilities include a recently refurbished playground, formal gardens, and a wildlife area with interpretation signage. The generous size of this site provides visitors with a choice of spaces to spend time in.

Disabled toilet Disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

Railings surround the site, with a quiet pedestrian footpath, Church Walk, along one side but the ubiquitous and intrusive Westway flyover and Harrow Road along the other side.


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

Many grave stones and mausoleums can still be found in the park, which comprises mainly of large grass areas and large mature trees. A playground is at the southern end. Little Venice sports centre is adjacent to the site to the north, and Westminster College boarders the park to the south. The site provides a link between Church Walk and Paddington Green to Edgware Road via Crompton Street. This site is in the process of having improvements and being re-designed where appropriate.

Opening hours 8am – dusk.

Disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

It mostly consists of grass with spring bulbs and some trees.
There is no formal path through the space.

Disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

A low hedge encloses a central grass area with a mature plane tree in the centre, dominating the square. There is also level access into the site from Marylebone Road. A market, “Cabbages and Frocks”, occupies most of the cobbled driveway at the weekends.

Opening hours: 7am – dusk.

Disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

It contains well maintained shrub beds with year-round interest. The central pergola walkway feature provides a focal point.

Disabled access Dogs not allowed


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

The Westway flyover has a dominant presence adjacent to and above the site. Currently the open space comprises of a rectangle of paving with two levels, a grid of trees, and an area of grass, but it is a canal-side open space full of potential which it is hoped will soon be realised.

Disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

It contains a central circular plant bed surrounded by pathways, box hedges and lawn areas and is relatively formal in feel. The whole site is bordered by trees and shrubs.

Disabled access Dogs not allowed


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

There is a small weeping ash tree with a circular bench around it set within a new circular area of yorkstone paving creating a more human scaled central focal point.

Talbot Square underwent major refurbishment in 2009 with the reinstatement of the new railings and new surfacing. After liasing with English Heritage, appropriate historic railings were reinstated around the entire perimeter of the square, these incorporated a new entrance feature and metalwork arch leading onto Sussex Gardens, and helped restore the traditional formal dignified character of the space. A new yorkstone paving area adjacent to the main entrance space was also added with seating and access to the 2 main resin bound paths that run the length of the gardens.

• Disabled access • Dogs not allowed


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

It is well screened from the surrounding roads with shrub planting.

Opening hours: 7am – dusk.

Play area

Disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

It includes a wide central path, planting beds, and various statues. It has recently undergone a major historical railing reinstatement project – reinstating historically appropriate railings that match those of The Whitehall section of Victoria Embankment. This project has greatly improved the visual appearance of the gardens from both the adjacent road and river, and has helped restore and reintroduce an appropriate level of formality to the gardens.

Disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

It consists mainly of informal bench seating facing and over-looking the river. The space provides great views across the river Thames towards the South Bank opposite, and benefits from the mature tree canopy of the large Plane trees planted along the adjacent embankment at street level.

No disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

It was designed in the Italian style by Charles Barry in 1845 and subsequently embellished with lions by Landseer and fountains by Lutyens. At the centre of the space is Nelsons column with the four lion statues splaying out at its base. Various Statues and sculptures are displayed on the various plinths in the square, including the ‘fourth plinth’, which is located in the north-west corner closest to the Sainsburys wing of the National Gallery and displays and hosts a changing programme of contemporary art.

The name of the square commemorates and refers to the Battle of Trafalgar, a British naval victory against Napoleon fought in 1805. The square has also been used as a location for events or political demonstrations, and is key destination at times like New Year's Eve.

The northern area of the square consists of a grand staircase leading up to a large pedestrian area and the backdrop of The National Gallery.


If you want to hold an event or film on the north terrace, please visit Westminster Council’s Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390. Please note that the rest of the square is managed by the Greater London Authority and you will need to contact them directly for permission.

It is used mainly by office workers as somewhere to have their lunch or people arriving in london or in transit from one of the nearby stations. Being slightly further away from Victoria station, and more screened by vegetation from the adjacent road, Upper Grosvenor Gardens is less busy than its neighbouring Lower Grosvenor Gardens. The gardens consist of ornamental lawns, bedding plants and shrubs, with a life-sized sculpture of a Lioness chasing a Lesser Kudu in the centre which was commissioned by the Duke of Westminster from the sculptor Jonathan Kenworthy. Both Upper and Lower Grsovenor gardens were named after the Grosvenor family who were great landowners in central London. Upper Grosvenor Garden was re-landscaped and only actually opened to the public for the first time in the year 2000.


If you want to hold an event or film in this park, please note that it is not managed by Westminster City Council and you will need to contact the relevant landowner directly for permission.

The park provides a welcome retreat from busy Embankment and bustling Villiers Street and is popular with office workers as a pleasant space to eat lunch and relax. There are grass areas with impressive bedding displays throughout the year. A bandstand has a programme of events throughout the summer and visitors to the gardens can sit in deckchairs to enjoy.

The historical Watergate is in one corner of the park, built in 1626 as an entrance to the Thames for the Duke of Buckingham. The gate is still in its original position, but since its creation the Thames water line has moved and the gate is some 100 metres from the water. There are various statues in the park including that of John Stuart Mill, Lady Henry Somerset statue of girl with begging bowl, William Howard Forster statue, and a memorial to the poet Robert Burns.

Disabled access Bandstand


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

The gardens were formed by Sir Joseph Bazelgette’s scheme of land reclamation to provide underground sewers and the Circle tube line completed in July 1870.

This section of the gardens comprises of a formal garden with impressive shrub and seasonal bedding displays.

Disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

It is enclosed with traditional railings and lanterns. It contains benches, plant beds and mature Indian Bean trees at each end and has a statue of a young Queen Victoria

disabled access

Opening hours to the public – weekdays only 9am-dusk


If you want to hold an event or film in this park, please note that it is not managed by Westminster City Council and you will need to contact the relevant landowner directly for permission.

The space is predominantly open for events and ceremonial processions connected to the adjacent cathedral that take place in the space throughout the year. A subtle stone step and ramp feature was recently added to the front of the cathedral, this provides both the required disabled access to the cathedral and an appropriate approach to the entrance of the cathedral.

The Cathedral site was originally known as Bulinga Fen and was part of a marsh area around Westminster. The land was reclaimed by the Benedictine monks from Westminster Abbey and used as a market area and fairground. After the reformation the land mainly remained as waste land but at various times became a maze, a pleasure garden, even a ring for bull-baiting and by the 17th century a prison.

In 1884 the site was acquired by the Catholic Church, and in 1895 the foundation stone of Westminster Cathedral was laid and the exterior of the building was fully completed eight years later. It was designed in the Early Christian Byzantine style by the Victorian architect John Francis Bentley. The cathedral opened in 1903, shortly after Bentley's death. Despite the interior spaces being impressive in scale and form, a lack of finances meant that much of the proposed interior decoration could not be realized, and although large sections of the mosaic have since been added much of the interior remains incomplete today.

The piazza is often used as an informal meeting point for office workers in and around Victoria, and creates a welcomed area of open free space halfway along Victoria Street.

Disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

The space has a small playground at the bridge end and a central obelisk feature in the middle. Raised seats provide views across the river. There is a statue of Emily Pankhurst and Fountain commemorating the end of slavery.

Playground Disabled access


If you want to hold an event or film in this park, please note that it is not managed by Westminster City Council and you will need to contact the relevant landowner directly for permission.

It contains a grassy area with seats overlooking a balustrade to the River Thames.

Disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

Play area Disabled access Toilets


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

Mature, shrub boarders dominate on the perimeter with clear sections affording views in and out. There are a couple of seats and a central grass area to enjoy the tranquillity of the space.

Dogs not allowed No disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

The largest area has the Westway running adjacent to the parks longest side, and contains a large central grass area surrounded by trees and shrubs, a playground, wildflower meadow, and a fitness trail.

The second section of the gardens is located between Bourne Terrace and Senior Street, this contains another playground and grass areas as well as the entrance to a local junior school.

The third section extends from Senior Street to the canal and then links along the canal side to Harrow Road. This section contains a dual-use pedestrian and cycle path, a sundial feature and access to the towpath.

Has a dog area Disabled access


If you would like to hold an event or film in this park please visit the Special Events website at www.westminster.gov.uk/specialevents or call 020 7641 2390.

It also includes a new skate-park and a series of multi-use sports pitches along Torquay Street predominantly situated beneath the Westway flyover road. These spaces fall outside the boundary of the Westminster Academy and are available for free use at all times.


If you want to hold an event or film in this park, please note that it is not managed by Westminster City Council and you will need to contact the relevant landowner directly for permission.